Friday, January 20, 2017

We the People -- January 20, 2017

theamplifierfoundation.or
A poster by Shepard Fairey.  Thanks to The Amplifier Foundation (theamplifierfoundation.or). 

These free downloadable posters may not be sold or used for profit. Amplifier does not authorize illegal postings. Beware of laws in your local community.

I'm going to miss Barack Obama and Joe Biden.  

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Ringling Bros' World's Greatest Shows -- January 18, 2017

San Francisco Call, 09-September-1900
Over the weekend, I was saddened to learn that the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus was calling it quits after about 147 years.  In September, 1900, the "Ringling Bros.' World's Greatest Shows, The Invincible Monarch of Amusements and Beyond All Dispute or Doubt the Greatest Show on Earth" paid its first visit to San Francisco.  They purchased the Barnum and Bailey Circus in 1905.  My parents took me and my sister every year at the Cow Palace. I can still smell it. 

Be sure to click on the ad, which is very large, to see the details. 

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Muhammad Ali 75 -- January 17, 2017

www.listal.com
Muhammad Ali, who may have been The Greatest of All Time,was born 75 years ago today, on 17-January-1942.  I got interested in boxing during the time after Ali gave up the heavyweight title.  I liked Joe Frazier.  I liked his name and I liked his workingman style.

I started reading The Ring Magazine while it was still being published by its founder, Nat Fleischer. I loved his articles about the history of boxing. Fleischer insisted on calling Muhammed Ali Cassius Clay.  Fleischer didn't call Jack Dempsey Bill.  He didn't call Sugar Ray Robinson Walker Smith.  He didn't call Pancho Villa Francisco Guilledo.  So why wouldn't he call Ali Ali?  I began to suspect it might have something to with racism or what we now call Islamophobia.
 
The documentary When We Were Kings told the story of The Rumble in the Jungle, Ali's 1974 fight in Zaire against giant George Foreman.  No one expected Ali to win.  Some people expected Ali to die.  I still get the chant "Ali, boma ye!" stuck in my head.

I remember a program Ali did on ABC's Wide World of Sports where he sat with Howard Cosell and watched movies of past heavyweight champs.  Ali said he would have beaten each one.  I wonder if he would have beaten Jack Johnson or Joe Louis.  In either case, it would have been a heck of a fight.  I would like to see the show again.

Kevin Starr and Gene Cernan -- January 17, 2017


Former San Francisco City Librarian and California State Librarian Kevin Starr died.  I haven't yet read his whole California Dream series, but I have enjoyed what I have read.  He was always helpful to people who were interested in learning about history. 


We lost another astronaut.  Gene Cernan, a Naval aviator, was the last person to walk on the Moon so far. 

Monday, January 16, 2017

Happy Birthday, Dr King, 2017 -- January 16, 2017

www.listal.com
“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in healthcare is the most shocking and inhumane.” —
 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

We should keep this in mind as Congress marches boldly forward to repeal the Affordable Care Act, gut Medicare and Medicaid and destroy CHIP. 

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Human Be-In 50 Years -- January 14, 2017



Fifty years ago, on 14-January-1967, I lived up the hill from Golden Gate Park, not far from the Polo Fields.  I don't remember this particular event, but I remember later ones when I could hear the music.  I remember some adults complaining about these events.  I never got to go.

The Human Be-In was an early Hippie event in the park. 

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Colonel William F Cody, 100 Years -- January 10, 2017

www.listal.com

Colonel William F Cody, Buffalo Bill, died 100 years ago today, on 10-January-1917.  He received the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1872 for his gallantry as a scout.  It was revoked in 1917 when Congress changed the rules and had many older medals reviewed.  It was restored in 1989.  

Seattle Star, 10-January-1917
"BUFFALO BILL"
LOSES HARD FIGHT;
HE DIES AT NOON

DENVER Colo., Jan 10 — Wm F Cody (Buffalo Bill) is dead. The noted plainsman and scout breathed his last at 12:05 p m. today, and with his paasing it seemed to the thousands of friends who had closely followed hi« fight for life as if the laat vestige of the old West, the "wild and woolly" West, had passed with him.

He died at the home of his sister. Mrs May Cody Decker, of this city, where for weeks he lay critically ill, fighting the hardest battle of his life.

Hope Gone for Weeks

Weeks ago friends despaired of his recovery from a complication of disease. but Buffalo Bill refused to give up. He rallied to the extent that he could be removed to Glenwood Springs for his health, but a relapse occurred and he was brought back to Denver.

Thruout his 70 years, Buffalo Bill has always been active and won the most admiration of young America by his adventuresome life. 

Killed Buffaloes

He was born William Frederick Cody, but in 1867 killed 4,280 buffalo in 18 months, and ever since
America has known him as Buffalo Bill.

Up to the civil war, Cody was a pony express rider. He enlisted with the the Seventh Kansas aa scout
and guide during the war. and became colonel.

Government Scout

In 1868 Cody tiecame a government scout and furnished the thrills of Indian warfare, of which most American boys have read. He boasts he took part in more Indian battles than any other white man.  In one he savs. he killed Yellow Hand, the Cheyenne chief, in a hand-to-hand fight.

Buffalo Bill bacame rich with his Wild West show, which he started in 1876. He toured the world with his cowboye and ponies, giving Europe its first glimpse of America's wild and woolly West.  Later he lost the bulk of his fortune.

Tried to Make Stage Star

Retiring from the show, Buffalo Bill lived on his Western ranch, where he has devoted his later years to reclamation of arid lands in Wyoming.  He turned the Big Horn valley from a barren, sun-dried  waste into fruitful, wealth-producing country. 

At one time Cody spent $60,000 to make Mrs Katherlne Clemmons Gould, wife of the millionaire, Howard Gould, a stage star.  He sued her for that amount, which he claimed he lost in the unsuccessful venture.  The suit was withdrawn, however, before decision was made.